Related Topics
Investing , Stocks
     

Yes, “Active Investment Managers” DO Behave Like the “Crowd”

…and that’s not a good thing

by Bob Stokes
Updated: December 01, 2020

When people hear the phrase "investing crowd," they tend to think of Main Street investors. Usually dipping their toe in the water after the trend has been underway for quite some time, they are typically seen as the "more cautious" types than Wall Street pros.

Of course, there is a flip side to that "cautiousness": The "investing crowd" is known for panic-selling near market bottoms and going "all in" near major market tops.

What's more, Main Street investors are not alone in their "crowd" behavior. It actually permeates most of the investment world, including the professionals.

For example, one might think that professional money managers -- with all their education and experience -- would take a more reflective and independent stance when considering investment ideas.

But the evidence shows that investment professionals herd like most everyone else.

Here's a chart and commentary from Robert Prechter's 2017 book, The Socionomic Theory of Finance:

FundManagersHerd

It is widely known that professional money managers, in the aggregate, fail to beat the market. The result is not, as some theorists say, because the market moves randomly. It is because most professionals are herding, right along with other speculators. [The chart shows] that at good prices for buying stock, mutual fund managers have high levels of cash, and at good prices for selling, they have low levels of cash. This record confirms that they consistently do the opposite of what they should be doing for maximum return.

This chart from our Nov. 25 U.S. Short Term Update shows another way that active investment managers herd. Here's the commentary:

LeveragedLong

The current reading of 106.41 in the National Association of Active Investment Managers Exposure Index is compatible with the extreme readings in the II Survey and the equity p/c ratio. A 100 reading in the Exposure Index means that active managers are fully invested in equities. A level of 106.41 means managers are more than fully invested; they are leveraged long... Notice managers' equity position in March of this year, just 10.65. Active managers herd like all investors. They become more optimistic as stocks rally and more pessimistic as stocks decline.

When the stance of active investment managers reaches an extreme, it's usually a sign that a trend reversal is just around the corner.

At times, however, such "extremes" can persist.

What does today's extreme mean? For answers, it's best to also consult the Elliott wave model. When sentiment measures and a market's Elliott wave pattern are in agreement, a market juncture like today's can be made with even greater confidence.

Get our latest analysis of the U.S. stock market as you read our flagship Financial Forecast Service.

The Next Financial Crisis: Why Wait for the "First Domino to Fall"?

Warnings serve you best when they're issued and heeded beforehand. Alas, in the financial world, most people wait until the first domino falls before taking action to protect themselves.

You know how fast dominoes fall.

By the time people "hem and haw" about what to do, much of the damage has already occurred.

Don't be like the majority.

Enjoy the assured feeling of being prepared before the next inevitable financial crisis.

Learn the big message that is found in our Financial Forecast Service, so you can take steps toward your financial safety now.

Get started by following the link below.

EXCLUSIVE

Germany’s Bonds: How to Spot Rising Yields Without Reading the News

U.S. Treasury yields aren't the only ones that have been rising. Just like here in the U.S., you can find a lot of "fundamental" explanations for the moves in German bonds. But watch how an Elliott wave pattern warned of these developments as they were just starting.

Groupon (GRPN): See the “Value of a Blank Price Chart”

If you've ever applied technical indicators to a price chart, you know the challenge -- namely, where do you even begin? Watch our Trader's Classroom editor walk you through a "blank chart" of GRPN to show you how to spot simple levels of support and resistance, for starters -- and get an idea as to what's next.

Beware of This Classic “Tip Off” Behavior in the Stock Market

This time-tested indicator provided a warning before the historic 2007 stock market top, and here in 2021, investors should focus on this indicator again. Find out why.